Guest Blogger Etiquette

As someone who went to a great deal of time and effort to set up a guest blog tour myself in honor of my debut novella, Forsaken By Shadow, I feel that I am qualified to write an instructive post about guest blogger etiquette.  Because after yesterday’s call for guest bloggers, I saw a number of violations that compelled me to jot out this post.  Note that this is not at all directed to the people I’ve said “yes” to or the people I actually KNOW.

Whether you are scheduling a blog tour yourself or a blogger is making a call for guest posts, always treat this process with the same respect you would a query letter. By this I mean, either way, this person is doing you a favor by allowing you access to their audience.  So BE POLITE.

Pay attention to the blogger’s requirements (if they are listed–I made a few in my post that were often ignored).  If the blogger requests that you email them, do so.  Or DM them on Twitter.  Or use the contact form on their blog.  Try to keep your request professional and out of public channels (i.e. Don’t just do an @ message on Twitter).  Never underestimate the importance of following directions.  As a teacher, I’m continually astounded by the general inability of my students to do this.

Put forth some effort into looking at past content on the blog so that you know the content and audience before you say a word. My blog is geared toward writers and readers, so post topics outside those realms are wholly inappropriate.

Make sure you get the blogger’s name right. We tend to find it rude when you obviously didn’t take the time to check.

If you are contacting a blogger you have not already established a relationship with, be prepared to do guest posts rather than an interview. If you haven’t established a relationship with someone, then how are they to know what kinds of questions to ask you?

If you’re setting up a tour and/or wanting to post about a new release, be sure to provide the blogger information about both YOURSELF AND said book: genre, length, blurb, etc. Don’t make us ask for this necessary information.  BE INFORMATIVE.

Don’t just ask a blogger to go check out your blog and let you know if they want you to guest blog for them. Especially without following the above rules of etiquette and not bothering to check to see whether your content would be remotely appropriate.  Dude, that is rude.  You’re expecting THEM to do work and wander around to figure out what you may post because you didn’t bother to mention it?  No.  That’s not how this works.  That’s like the blogging equivalent of a telemarketer.  You write up a query listing some proposed topics for them to choose from and link to your blog or something else as an example of your writing style.  And again you do this privately in email, not publicly on Twitter.

After you’ve been accepted as a guest blogger, be sure to get your post to the host before their deadline. This is just polite and responsible and allows them ample time to schedule your post and deal with any problems.

Be sure to provide a plug at the bottom of your post that provides a brief one or two line bio, and lists all your links: social media, website, etc. This is the quick and easy way to let readers know who you are and how to find you, which is, after all, largely the point of guest blogging.

10 thoughts on “Guest Blogger Etiquette

  1. [longer comment deleted/tongue bitten] I think the most important thing you get across here is the idea that you’re asking for a favor. Even if you feel it’s mutually beneficial (likely it is), it’s still you asking for a favor. So try not to make a girl work for it.

    Now, as someone who has gone on the blog tour, when will you be giving us the “How To Be A Good Hostess” tutorial?

  2. This is really helpful. As an author gearing up for a tour, I do most of these, but not all of them (deadline thing!) I really appreciate these bloggers lending me their audience when they let me post.

    Interesting the way you note interviews come more from a relationship. That never occurred to me.

    • Kait Nolan

      Dude it is HARD to come up with interview questions for somebody you know nothing about! At least interesting ones. 😀

  3. As a newby reviewer, blogger, annoyer of authors, I found your article informative, light, and actually funny. Each of your points seem well-conducted and important to boot.

    • Kait Nolan

      Oh good. I was hoping I didn’t come off as ragingly annoyed and bitchy.

  4. This post will stay flagged for future reference. All great points.

    • Kait Nolan

      You managed to follow all of them without being told 😀

      • That means i have to go call my mom and thank her for bringing me up right. Hate that. 🙂

  5. Thanks for this post, Kait. It never ceases to amaze me the lack of basic manners among some people.
    I posted a blog entry on Self-Publishing Central in September about 25 places where self-pubbers could obtain reviews of their works. Shortly after my posting, I received a request from a blogger to have her site added to my list.
    Her request began: “Hi. I would like my blog to be added to the review list that deals with indie authors. [provided inacurate blog link] I look forward to hearing from you.”
    No “Please.” No description of the blog — and the link provided continued to be either omitted or inaccurate in three subsequent emailings, to which I responded politely in each case.
    When I finally received and posted her correct link to my blog, she didn’t even thank me. Now, a month later, her blog link is defunct.
    So I completely understand why you would appreciate some common courtesies when others would like you to share your blog space.
    All the best!

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